A Career Graduation Gift

After Graduation… Then What?

One of Life’s Most Confusing Moments Comes When a Student Has to Make the Leap From School to Career.

Once a student has graduated, they find themselves confused and without the information, experience or resources to help them make the most important choices of their lives. This is the time when lifetime career decisions are made – decisions that can lead to a happy and rewarding career, or to career frustration.

How Prepared are Young People to Deal with the World of Careers?

Do they know how to get jobs? Do they know what jobs to get? Do they know what fields are available to pursue? Do they know which occupations will most satisfy them? In most cases they don’t even know what careers exist, aside from the most common ones – doctor, lawyer, editor, designer, writer, teacher, financial analyst, marketing executive, etc. And yet, without this important information, they make decisions that direct the entire course of their lives.

There is a Systematic Process for Creating a Successful Career. 

There is a way for one’s interests, talents, education, skills and personality to intermesh to create a career that is fulfilling, successful and intentional. This system combines self-understanding, aptitude, personality analysis along with occupational information. Missing any part of this process dramatically decreases one’s chance for success.

If You Know a Recent Graduate, This is the Opportunity to Give Them the Gift of a Lifetime – the Gift of the Right Career Fit. 

How often have you heard people say, “If only I had known what career direction to take, my whole life could have been different.” A young person’s choice of careers, at this point, may have a greater impact on their future than any other decision they will make for the rest of their lives.

Contact Me to Find Out More.

Call or email me and I will be glad to further describe my process and how the gift of a career consultation would work in your recent grad’s individual situation.

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Many people blame their career problems on the economy or the job market, but so often the real obstacles come from within. Unrecognized internal barriers can become impediments to success as they keep us from moving forward and block us from getting what we want.

Only by discovering the real issues can we transform ourselves from feeling victimized and take control of our own job fate. This clarity is what leads to a strategy for success and career satisfaction.

Here Are Some of the Most Common Internal Barriers I Work With:

Value Conflicts:
People often become locked into an internal tug-of-war between conflicting values – making lots of money versus time for personal life; freedom versus security; independence versus structure; stability versus change. With deeper understanding, you can break free of these conflicts and actually put them to use in constructing an appropriate career strategy.

Messages We Get from Our Parents:
Many people live their lives trying to achieve a set of goals and objectives that come from their parents and have no relationship to who they really are. This is a recipe for career unhappiness. The messages we get from our parents have enormous influence on how we live our lives. Only by identifying those messages can we let them go, and begin to live our lives as who we truly are — rather than who we’re told we ‘should’ be.

Your Self Image Doesn’t Measure Up to Your Talents:
I see this so frequently. People devalue their own skills and talents — precisely because they come so naturally — causing them to be blind to what they have to offer. But, by recognizing and identifying your own strengths you can turn this cycle around and begin, for the first time, to move into a satisfying career that truly expresses your talents and gifts.

Unrealistic Expectations and Unclear Priorities:
Whether it comes from one’s parent, co-workers or friends — many people are caught in the grip of unrealistic expectations about careers. They are trapped between fantasy and reality. This can lead to unclear priorities. In life we can’t always get everything we want, so it’s important to find out which trade-offs you’re willing to make, and which you’re not.

Fear of Risk or Change:
Are you locked into an unhappy job situation because you’re not willing to take risks or accept change? There are many solutions for transforming your career prospects — and they don’t all require huge risks. Some of my clients have been amazed to see how small shifts — done with deep insight and understanding — can achieve big results. Not every move needs to be earth shaking.

Self-knowledge is the key to overcoming your barriers. Once you see through these internal resistances, you are in a better position to move beyond them towards a more satisfying and rewarding career.

If you feel that you would like to identify and work through any of the internal barriers that are keeping you from getting what you want, I would be happy to assist you.

 

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May 18, 2016 · 5:13 pm

Is Your Career True to Your Values?

New York Career Counselor and Coach - Eileen Sharaga

Career dissatisfaction often comes from value conflicts. While you may seem successful to the rest of the world, if your job isn’t true to your inner values you can feel unhappy and empty inside.

Whether we realize it or not, our sense of harmony is when our values and our work come together. Career satisfaction comes from knowing who we are and what we want.

The complexity of today’s workplace makes career decision-making difficult. We need some criteria for our life choices, and often these criteria come from our values. Getting to the heart of the problem means taking a clear look at your innermost values.

Here are some important questions to ask yourself…

  • What are your highest priorities at this point in your life?
  • What elements in your work situation do you value most? And least?
  • What role does money play in your life?
  • Do you believe in the product…

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Internal Barriers and Career Satisfaction

Many people blame their career problems on the economy or the job market, but so often the real obstacles come from within. Unrecognized internal barriers can become impediments to success as they keep us from moving forward and block us from getting what we want.

Only by discovering the real issues can we transform ourselves from feeling victimized and take control of our own job fate. This clarity is what leads to a strategy for success and career satisfaction.

Here Are Some of the Most Common Internal Barriers I Work With:

Value Conflicts:
People often become locked into an internal tug-of-war between conflicting values – making lots of money versus time for personal life; freedom versus security; independence versus structure; stability versus change. With deeper understanding, you can break free of these conflicts and actually put them to use in constructing an appropriate career strategy.

Messages We Get from Our Parents:
Many people live their lives trying to achieve a set of goals and objectives that come from their parents and have no relationship to who they really are. This is a recipe for career unhappiness. The messages we get from our parents have enormous influence on how we live our lives. Only by identifying those messages can we let them go, and begin to live our lives as who we truly are — rather than who we’re told we ‘should’ be.

Your Self Image Doesn’t Measure Up to Your Talents:
I see this so frequently. People devalue their own skills and talents — precisely because they come so naturally — causing them to be blind to what they have to offer. But, by recognizing and identifying your own strengths you can turn this cycle around and begin, for the first time, to move into a satisfying career that truly expresses your talents and gifts.

Unrealistic Expectations and Unclear Priorities:
Whether it comes from one’s parent, co-workers or friends — many people are caught in the grip of unrealistic expectations about careers. They are trapped between fantasy and reality. This can lead to unclear priorities. In life we can’t always get everything we want, so it’s important to find out which trade-offs you’re willing to make, and which you’re not.

Fear of Risk or Change:
Are you locked into an unhappy job situation because you’re not willing to take risks or accept change? There are many solutions for transforming your career prospects — and they don’t all require huge risks. Some of my clients have been amazed to see how small shifts — done with deep insight and understanding — can achieve big results. Not every move needs to be earth shaking.

Self-knowledge is the key to overcoming your barriers. Once you see through these internal resistances, you are in a better position to move beyond them towards a more satisfying and rewarding career.

If you feel that you would like to identify and work through any of the internal barriers that are keeping you from getting what you want, I would be happy to assist you.

Leave a comment

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Is Your Career True to Your Values?

Career dissatisfaction often comes from value conflicts. While you may seem successful to the rest of the world, if your job isn’t true to your inner values you can feel unhappy and empty inside.Whether we realize it or not, our sense of harmony is when our values and our work come together. Career satisfaction comes from knowing who we are and what we want.The complexity of today’s workplace makes career decision-making difficult. We need some criteria for our life choices, and often these criteria come from our values. Getting to the heart of the problem means taking a clear look at your innermost values.Here are some important questions to ask yourself…What are your highest priorities at this point in your life?What elements in your work situation do you value most? And least?What role does money play in your life?Do you believe in the product, service or industry you’re engaged in?What is your definition of success?If you could imagine a perfect work-life, what would it look like?For a more in-depth look at career and value issues, here is a link to an article I wrote titled “Does Your Career Support Your Values or Fight Them”

via Is Your Career True to Your Values?.

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Filed under Articles

Is Your Career True To Your Values?

Career dissatisfaction often comes from value conflicts. While you may seem successful to the rest of the world, if your job isn’t true to your inner values you can feel unhappy and empty inside.

Whether we realize it or not, our sense of harmony is when our values and our work come together. Career satisfaction comes from knowing who we are and what we want.

The complexity of today’s workplace makes career decision-making difficult. We need some criteria for our life choices, and often these criteria come from our values. Getting to the heart of the problem means taking a clear look at your innermost values.

Here are some important questions to ask yourself…

  • What are your highest priorities at this point in your life?
  • What elements in your work situation do you value most? And least?
  • What role does money play in your life?
  • Do you believe in the product, service or industry you’re engaged in?
  • What is your definition of success?
  • If you could imagine a perfect work-life, what would it look like?
For a more in-depth look at career and value issues, here is a link to an article I wrote titled “Does Your Career Support Your Values or Fight Them” 

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Is Your Career True To Your Values?

Career dissatisfaction often comes from value conflicts. While you may seem successful to the rest of the world, if your job isn’t true to your inner values you can feel unhappy and empty inside.

Whether we realize it or not, our sense of harmony is when our values and our work come together. Career satisfaction comes from knowing who we are and what we want.

The complexity of today’s workplace makes career decision-making difficult. We need some criteria for our life choices, and often these criteria come from our values. Getting to the heart of the problem means taking a clear look at your innermost values.

Here are some important questions to ask yourself…

  • What are your highest priorities at this point in your life?
  • What elements in your work situation do you value most? And least?
  • What role does money play in your life?
  • Do you believe in the product, service or industry you’re engaged in?
  • What is your definition of success?
  • If you could imagine a perfect work-life, what would it look like?
For a more in-depth look at career and value issues, here is a link to an article I wrote titled “Does Your Career Support Your Values or Fight Them” 

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles