Social Media and the Job Search

The job world is changing rapidly. Knowing how to develop your online presence and how to look for work online is becoming critically important. Social networks are becoming part of the criteria that hiring managers use to find or weed out applicants.

As I ramp up my own social networking platforms, I thought this would be a good time to discuss tips on Social Media that will be useful for your job search. We’ll focus specifically on two main players: LinkedIn, and Facebook.

LinkedIn:

•    Think of your profile headline as your “2 minute written pitch”. It should describe in a sentence who you are, and what you are looking for.

•    Join groups and search out contacts and companies that are in line with your career goals, and engage in conversation. Not only will you know first hand when they are hiring, they’ll also be aware of your knowledge in the field, due to these interactions.

•    You can post a question or offer advice to a posting to get your intentions across. The more times you comment on a topic, the more activity shows up on your profile.

•    Contact past colleagues, employers and classmates using the “ask for a recommendation” feature. Once they respond, their testimonials will appear on your profile.

Facebook:

•    Give your profile a make-over by erasing game applications, and adjusting the features so that all your personal photos become private. Set the settings to block tagged images from appearing on your wall, and only leave posts relevant to your career focus, allowing thought-provoking business opinions to dominate your page.

•    Create a Page for yourself, which will allow people to subscribe to your postings and begin following you without having to add you as a friend. Make sure this page contains your resume and only professional posts and information. Edit the privacy settings on your profile, to make it private. This way, only your Page will appear on Google and other search engines.

If you need help getting started with your job search, I can provide you with the tools and resources that will make you more confident and focused. Join my Facebook page to receive further job search tips.

 

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5 Common Career Myths & Mistakes

A single mistaken thought or misguided perception can send you down a career path that will be frustrating, inappropriate or just plain wrong for who you are. Here are 5 of the most common mistaken beliefs that derail people’s careers.

“I’m going into it for the money”:
Sure, we all like making money – but a high salary can never substitute for authentic job satisfaction. Following the dollar rather than your passions can actually make you bitter, lower your productivity, pull you off track and rob you of the positive feelings and exuberance that comes from loving what you do.

“Being an entrepreneur will give me freedom”:
Being an entrepreneur may lead to huge rewards – but it also may be the very opposite of freedom. Often it means never being able to stop thinking and worrying about your work, your company 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It could also mean having to choose between family and work. If you’re not really passionate about what you’re doing, you won’t have the energy to sustain the motivation needed.
“I’ll get an advanced degree – then I’ll be set for life”:
If you’ve chosen a career direction and the degree supports your getting there – that’s great. But if you’re thinking “I’ll get the degree first, and decide later,” then that degree could end up as a very expensive postponing technique. Before you pay thousands of dollars and time going to school, you better be sure you are focused on an appropriate, well thought out goal.

“I want a glamorous career in a fashionable industry”:
What a job or industry looks like from the outside is often the very opposite of what it’s like from the inside. Glamorous industries are often fraught with long hours, internal politics, detailed drudgework and shallow values. It’s important to collect first hand information and understand the industry issues.  If you don’t do your research you could end up for a big shock, by finding out you’ve chosen a totally inappropriate career.

“I hate my boss, I hate the office politics…”:
Over-generalizing can lead to drastic moves.  It’s so important to isolate the problem and differentiate the issues from the assumptions. Being unhappy may cause you to over emphasize the negative without being aware of the positive. Often I’ve seen people become totally happy by making a slight shift or finding another job in the same industry. Not every problem requires huge shifts.I’ve spent over 15 years helping people solve their career problems, identify the mistakes they’re making and implement effective career plans that lead to fulfillment and satisfaction.. Often it’s a matter of sweeping away mistaken perceptions about yourself or the workplace. I’d be happy to help you resolve your career issues and implement a plan. Nothing is more life-transforming than a career that makes you happy.

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Many people blame their career problems on the economy or the job market, but so often the real obstacles come from within. Unrecognized internal barriers can become impediments to success as they keep us from moving forward and block us from getting what we want.

Only by discovering the real issues can we transform ourselves from feeling victimized and take control of our own job fate. This clarity is what leads to a strategy for success and career satisfaction.

Here Are Some of the Most Common Internal Barriers I Work With:

Value Conflicts:
People often become locked into an internal tug-of-war between conflicting values – making lots of money versus time for personal life; freedom versus security; independence versus structure; stability versus change. With deeper understanding, you can break free of these conflicts and actually put them to use in constructing an appropriate career strategy.

Messages We Get from Our Parents:
Many people live their lives trying to achieve a set of goals and objectives that come from their parents and have no relationship to who they really are. This is a recipe for career unhappiness. The messages we get from our parents have enormous influence on how we live our lives. Only by identifying those messages can we let them go, and begin to live our lives as who we truly are — rather than who we’re told we ‘should’ be.

Your Self Image Doesn’t Measure Up to Your Talents:
I see this so frequently. People devalue their own skills and talents — precisely because they come so naturally — causing them to be blind to what they have to offer. But, by recognizing and identifying your own strengths you can turn this cycle around and begin, for the first time, to move into a satisfying career that truly expresses your talents and gifts.

Unrealistic Expectations and Unclear Priorities:
Whether it comes from one’s parent, co-workers or friends — many people are caught in the grip of unrealistic expectations about careers. They are trapped between fantasy and reality. This can lead to unclear priorities. In life we can’t always get everything we want, so it’s important to find out which trade-offs you’re willing to make, and which you’re not.

Fear of Risk or Change:
Are you locked into an unhappy job situation because you’re not willing to take risks or accept change? There are many solutions for transforming your career prospects — and they don’t all require huge risks. Some of my clients have been amazed to see how small shifts — done with deep insight and understanding — can achieve big results. Not every move needs to be earth shaking.

Self-knowledge is the key to overcoming your barriers. Once you see through these internal resistances, you are in a better position to move beyond them towards a more satisfying and rewarding career.

If you feel that you would like to identify and work through any of the internal barriers that are keeping you from getting what you want, I would be happy to assist you.

 

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May 18, 2016 · 5:13 pm

Is Your Career True to Your Values?

New York Career Counselor and Coach - Eileen Sharaga

Career dissatisfaction often comes from value conflicts. While you may seem successful to the rest of the world, if your job isn’t true to your inner values you can feel unhappy and empty inside.

Whether we realize it or not, our sense of harmony is when our values and our work come together. Career satisfaction comes from knowing who we are and what we want.

The complexity of today’s workplace makes career decision-making difficult. We need some criteria for our life choices, and often these criteria come from our values. Getting to the heart of the problem means taking a clear look at your innermost values.

Here are some important questions to ask yourself…

  • What are your highest priorities at this point in your life?
  • What elements in your work situation do you value most? And least?
  • What role does money play in your life?
  • Do you believe in the product…

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Internal Barriers and Career Satisfaction

Many people blame their career problems on the economy or the job market, but so often the real obstacles come from within. Unrecognized internal barriers can become impediments to success as they keep us from moving forward and block us from getting what we want.

Only by discovering the real issues can we transform ourselves from feeling victimized and take control of our own job fate. This clarity is what leads to a strategy for success and career satisfaction.

Here Are Some of the Most Common Internal Barriers I Work With:

Value Conflicts:
People often become locked into an internal tug-of-war between conflicting values – making lots of money versus time for personal life; freedom versus security; independence versus structure; stability versus change. With deeper understanding, you can break free of these conflicts and actually put them to use in constructing an appropriate career strategy.

Messages We Get from Our Parents:
Many people live their lives trying to achieve a set of goals and objectives that come from their parents and have no relationship to who they really are. This is a recipe for career unhappiness. The messages we get from our parents have enormous influence on how we live our lives. Only by identifying those messages can we let them go, and begin to live our lives as who we truly are — rather than who we’re told we ‘should’ be.

Your Self Image Doesn’t Measure Up to Your Talents:
I see this so frequently. People devalue their own skills and talents — precisely because they come so naturally — causing them to be blind to what they have to offer. But, by recognizing and identifying your own strengths you can turn this cycle around and begin, for the first time, to move into a satisfying career that truly expresses your talents and gifts.

Unrealistic Expectations and Unclear Priorities:
Whether it comes from one’s parent, co-workers or friends — many people are caught in the grip of unrealistic expectations about careers. They are trapped between fantasy and reality. This can lead to unclear priorities. In life we can’t always get everything we want, so it’s important to find out which trade-offs you’re willing to make, and which you’re not.

Fear of Risk or Change:
Are you locked into an unhappy job situation because you’re not willing to take risks or accept change? There are many solutions for transforming your career prospects — and they don’t all require huge risks. Some of my clients have been amazed to see how small shifts — done with deep insight and understanding — can achieve big results. Not every move needs to be earth shaking.

Self-knowledge is the key to overcoming your barriers. Once you see through these internal resistances, you are in a better position to move beyond them towards a more satisfying and rewarding career.

If you feel that you would like to identify and work through any of the internal barriers that are keeping you from getting what you want, I would be happy to assist you.

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Is Your Career True to Your Values?

Career dissatisfaction often comes from value conflicts. While you may seem successful to the rest of the world, if your job isn’t true to your inner values you can feel unhappy and empty inside.Whether we realize it or not, our sense of harmony is when our values and our work come together. Career satisfaction comes from knowing who we are and what we want.The complexity of today’s workplace makes career decision-making difficult. We need some criteria for our life choices, and often these criteria come from our values. Getting to the heart of the problem means taking a clear look at your innermost values.Here are some important questions to ask yourself…What are your highest priorities at this point in your life?What elements in your work situation do you value most? And least?What role does money play in your life?Do you believe in the product, service or industry you’re engaged in?What is your definition of success?If you could imagine a perfect work-life, what would it look like?For a more in-depth look at career and value issues, here is a link to an article I wrote titled “Does Your Career Support Your Values or Fight Them”

via Is Your Career True to Your Values?.

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Is Your Career True To Your Values?

Career dissatisfaction often comes from value conflicts. While you may seem successful to the rest of the world, if your job isn’t true to your inner values you can feel unhappy and empty inside.

Whether we realize it or not, our sense of harmony is when our values and our work come together. Career satisfaction comes from knowing who we are and what we want.

The complexity of today’s workplace makes career decision-making difficult. We need some criteria for our life choices, and often these criteria come from our values. Getting to the heart of the problem means taking a clear look at your innermost values.

Here are some important questions to ask yourself…

  • What are your highest priorities at this point in your life?
  • What elements in your work situation do you value most? And least?
  • What role does money play in your life?
  • Do you believe in the product, service or industry you’re engaged in?
  • What is your definition of success?
  • If you could imagine a perfect work-life, what would it look like?
For a more in-depth look at career and value issues, here is a link to an article I wrote titled “Does Your Career Support Your Values or Fight Them” 

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